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No Depression has been the foremost journalistic authority on roots music for well over a decade, publishing 75 issues from 1995 to 2008. No Depression ceased publishing magazines in 2008 and took to the web. We have made the contents of those issues accessible online via this extensive archive and also feature a robust community website with blogs, photos, videos, music, news, discussion and more.

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Author: David Menconi

Waxed - Record Review from Issue #65 Sep-Oct 2006

Eric Bachmann – To The Races

A decade ago, when Eric Bachmann was playing angular punk rock with Archers Of Loaf, you never would’ve guessed that beneath that loud exterior beat the heart of…well, it would be hard to narrow that down to just one thing. Since then, Bachmann has connected with his inner film-score geek via Barry Black, and his [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #65 Sep-Oct 2006

Jesus H. Christ & The Four Hornsmen Of The Apocalypse – Self-Titled

Picture NRBQ with a metallic pop edge and an expanded horn section, fronted by a singer who looks a bit like Julia Louis Dreyfus, sounds a bit like Sarah Vowell, and writes a bit like Amy Rigby — only much nastier. There you have this wonderful New York band, who will completely rock your world. [...]

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Town and Country - Shorter Artist Feature from Issue #64 July-Aug 2006

Roman Candle – Upon further Revue…

It’s said that first impressions linger. Roman Candle can relate, because the band is in the midst of the most protracted first impression in recent memory. Its excellent debut album, The Wee Hours Revue, was released June 6 on V2 Records but has been in circulation in various forms for years, since it was first [...]

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The Long Way Around - Feature from Issue #64 July-Aug 2006

Chatham County Line – Ripe for the pickin’

“I think all the best records capture a mood rather than any sort of perfection. You know, none of us are virtuosos. You could replace all of us with Nashville cats. But this is us.” Dave Wilson Downtown Raleigh’s Lincoln Theatre is packed, and Chatham County Line is ready to go. But their gear isn’t [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #64 July-Aug 2006

Various Artists – Big Star, Small World

Big Star was the ultimate cult band, one whose music was “lost” for years before it was rediscovered and became part of the DNA of the Replacements, R.E.M., and other stars of the 1980s American rock underground. So it’s fitting that this Big Star tribute comes with a similarly checkered history. Some of these eleven [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #63 May-June 2006

Garrison Starr – The Sound Of You And Me

It’s easy to root for singer-songwriter Garrison Starr, whose first mainstream notice came with 1997′s Lilith-friendly pop hit “Superhero”. Starr has pursued a rootsier direction since then, somewhere betwixt Rosanne Cash and Shawn Colvin. She’s made a series of solid records that come tantalizingly close to great — most notably 2002′s Songs From Take-Off To [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #62 Mar-Apr 2006

Various Artists – Songs For Sixty Five Roses

Ask a young kid to say “cystic fibrosis,” and what comes out is something like “65 roses”; thus the title of this disc. When longtime North Carolina music scene veteran John Plymale’s daughter was diagnosed with the disease two years ago, he put together a benefit record to fight it. Plymale put out the call [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #62 Mar-Apr 2006

Southern Culture On The Skids – Doublewide And Live

Rick Miller is seldom mentioned as one of the great guitarists, but Doublewide And Live suggests he should be. Recorded at the Skids’ favorite hometown bar in Chapel Hill (Local 506, site of their long-running annual summertime bacchanal Sleazefest), Doublewide sizzles from the get-go thanks to Miller’s tireless playing. You just won’t believe the guy’s [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #61 Jan-Feb 2006

Subdudes – Behind The Levee

Few albums have been overtaken by unfortunate events as profoundly as Behind The Levee, the Subdudes’ now ironically-titled second album since their 2002 reunion. Understand, it’s a very nice record that won’t disappoint fans of the Subdudes’ second-line blue-eyed Creole soul. But it’s still difficult to hear songs evoking good times down in Louisiana without [...]

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Waxed - Record Review from Issue #61 Jan-Feb 2006

Robert Pollard – From A Compound Eye

Think of Guided By Voices’ 2004 breakup as analogous to a puzzling Chapter 11 bankruptcy declaration, in which a thriving enterprise is dissolved so the proprietor can…well, continue doing exactly the same thing as before, more or less. That would be frontman Robert Pollard, the lone constant throughout GBV’s existence. (Toward the end, he was [...]

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From the Blogs

  • Dylan, "Desire" and the (other) Story of Hurricane: A Lesson In Fatherhood
    Reading of the death of former pro boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter today awoke an old memory which reminded me how lucky I was to have, what in retrospect, was a pretty cool father.  I should add by "cool" I do not mean some kind of "over the hill hipster" who, in a desperate attempt at trying to stay relevant smokes pot or acts […]
  • Lachlan Bryan and The Wildes – Black Coffee (Album Review)
    After a successful solo outing, Aussie country singer Lachlan Bryan got his old band back into the studio and came up with this cracker of an album. It was released in the autumn of last year in Australia and subsequently picked up a major award as “Alternative Country” album of the year. Such acclaim means any belated praise from me is superfluous, but I’m […]
  • Album Reviews: Gord Downie & The Sadies, Bruce Springsteen, Lost & Nameless, The Annie Ford Band
    Gord Downie, The Sadies, and the Conquering Sun The lead singer of one of Canada’s most influential rock bands gets together with one of the best live bands ever for a collaborative effort and the expected results could range anywhere from confusion to straight ahead awesomeness. Thankfully (and not surprisingly, given the players involved) the semi-eponymou […]
  • Blackberry Smoke Is the Goddamn Truth
    Southern rock is a stylistic hodgepodge--a musical mutt.  Yet in this gumbo pot of a country, its impurities and cross-breeding make it the most American genre of all. And with the Allman Brothers drawing down, southern rock's current standard bearer is Blackberry Smoke, a lofty perch they hardly jeopardized during a lively set last night at Seattle […]
  • Goldie and the Gingerbreads: The First All-Female Guitar Band
    It could only happen in America: In 1947, a 7-year-old Polish-Jewish girl named Genyusha "Genya" Zelkovicz arrived in New York City's Lower East Side with her parents and a sister, speaking not a word of English. They were the only ones in their family to survive the Holocaust. Genya's mother nicknamed her Goldie, and thus began her Ameri […]
  • Wayne Kramer - Lexington (Album Review)
    Wayne Kramer is someone who's life story I'd very much like to read. From lead guitar in the Mighty MC5 to prison inmate to social activist (he recently interviewed Pussy Riot, and is constantly active in speaking out against such injustices) to new father, Kramer's life has an interesting story in every chapter. His latest record release (and […]

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